Howard Rheingold, Ted Nelson, and Doug Engelbart get together for Engelbart’s birthday

Wow. I wonder if this has happened before. Howard Rheingold invited Engelbart and Nelson to his place for a little chat. Looked like they had a good time. I really enjoyed listening to Nelson’s comments about the web. He speaks with such clarity on it.

It was also interesting to listen to Nelson’s wife talk about lyme disease. I vaguely remember hearing about a documentary that talked about some weird thing going on in the medical/insurance field, involving several doctors and a patent issue, around this disease that’s led to misdiagnosis for years for many patients. In light of this, hearing that she’s gotten conflicting information about the disease doesn’t surprise me. It sounds like a really unfortunate situation, though it also sounds like she’s probably gotten appropriate treatment for it.

Happy birthday, Doug 🙂

Originally shared by Howard Rheingold on Google+

It’s Doug Engelbart’s birthday today. We wouldn’t be doing this without his vision and tenacity in realizing it.

How the U.S. lost out on iPhone work

Originally shared by Max Huijgen on Google+

Apple clear: no job creation in US, infrastructure incapable

Asked by Obama, Steve Jobs said there was no way he would produce in the US

In a very in-depth article in the New York Times reporters investigate why Apple doesn´t want to create jobs in the US. It´s not about the wages as that´s secondary in high tech production. It´s about flexibility, engineering, sourcing and availability of the right kind of educated people. A revealing article and a must read.

Some quotes:

Another critical advantage for Apple was that China provided engineers at a scale the United States could not match. Apple’s executives had estimated that about 8,700 industrial engineers were needed to oversee and guide the 200,000 assembly-line workers eventually involved in manufacturing iPhones. The company’s analysts had forecast it would take as long as nine months to find that many qualified engineers in the United States.

In China, it took 15 days.

Companies like Apple “say the challenge in setting up U.S. plants is finding a technical work force,” said Martin Schmidt, associate provost at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In particular, companies say they need engineers with more than high school, but not necessarily a bachelor’s degree. Americans at that skill level are hard to find, executives contend. “They’re good jobs, but the country doesn’t have enough to feed the demand,” Mr. Schmidt said.

It is hard to estimate how much more it would cost to build iPhones in the United States. However, various academics and manufacturing analysts estimate that because labor is such a small part of technology manufacturing, paying American wages would add up to $65 to each iPhone’s expense. Since Apple’s profits are often hundreds of dollars per phone, building domestically, in theory, would still give the company a healthy reward.

The NYT doesn´t ask the question but I do: why can Intel bring back its assembly jobs to the US after 35 years in Malasya and is Apple stating it´s impossible?

How the U.S. lost out on iPhone work

SOPA/PIPA

I think Jason makes a good point. If these representatives are capable of this, they’re capable of other things just as bad.

Originally shared by Jason Becker on Google+

So the black out is over, we did it. We stopped SOPA and PIPA in their tracks it seems…

…didn’t we?

Unfortunately, the fight is not over. Not by a long shot. We may have won out today, but look at the extreme measures we had to go to to do it. Look at the huge publicity stunt pulled by the simultaneous “blackout” of popular websites. What if those staging the blackout were less organized? What if they did nothing? What if we did nothing? We still have the opportunity to find out.

We live during a time when our “representative government” does not represent us. Our politicians follow the money, and there was a big financial interest in taking freedom away from the general public in exchange for more money for the entertainment industry. A number of politicians succumbed to their greed and supported a bill that goes against the first amendment of the Bill of Rights in order to please the gargantuan entertainment lobby. They’ve shown their true colors, and now we have to ask ourselves, “How can we ever trust these men and women again?”

The answer is that we can’t. The career politician is a position that relies very heavily on a mutual-trust relationship with its constituency. They trust you to keep them employed, to keep them working for you, representing you, and you in turn trust them to represent your values and rights. This relationship is supposed to break down if they abuse your trust, but unfortunately we allow them to get away with it far too often.

The ideas that SOPA and PIPA represent (both the specific idea of oppressing our free use of the internet for the gain of the entertainment industry and the general idea of our representatives selling our rights to the highest bidder) still survive as long as the men and women who violated our mutual-trust relationship are allowed to continue.

Below, I’ve included a list of all the Representatives and Senators who have co-signed the SOPA and PIPA bills, respectively. We must send a clear message to the current and future career politicians of this country, saying that we will not tolerate a single violation of our trust. Spread this message far and wide, that not a single politician that supported such a blatant and obvious disregard for the best interests of the people they represent should ever be elected again, but rather will have a political “black mark” associated with his name. The United States of America is the greatest country in the world because we are a country governed by the governed. Don’t let your representatives ever forget that.

(An afterthought: This is more important than political parties. This was a bi-partisan act, and we must respond in a bi-partisan manner. If a politician from your favorite political party is on this list, from your state, please don’t vote for them, as tempting as it may be. I know full-well how hard it can be to accept ideas from an opposing political party, but isn’t it always better to vote for someone who hasn’t stabbed you in the back? Or to put it another way, isn’t it always worse to vote for someone who has? The important thing here is to create a lasting image that will inspire terror in any politician who even considers the idea of selling the trust of his represented public. Thank you for your time.)

AR

Representatives:

Timothy Griffin (R)

Senators:

John Boozman (R)

 

AZ

Representatives:

Ben Quayle (R)

Senators:

John McCain (R)

 

CA

Representatives:

Howard Berman (D)

Mary Bono Mack (R)

Elton Gallegly (R)

Adam Schiff (D)

Joe Baca (D)

Karen Bass (D)

Judy Chu (D)

Brad Sherman (D)

Senators:

Barbara Boxer (D)

Dianne Feinstein (D)

 

CO

Senators:

Michael Bennet (D)

 

CT

Representatives:

John Larson (D)

Senators:

Richard Blumenthal (D)

Joe Lieberman (D)

 

DE

Senators:

Chris Coons (D)

 

FL

Representatives:

Ted Deutch (D)

Dennis A. Ross(R)

Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D)

Senators:

Bill Nelson (D)

Marco Rubio (R)

 

GA

Representatives:

John Barrow (D)

Senators:

Saxby Chambliss (R)

Johnny Isakson (R)

 

IA

Senators:

Chuck Grassley (R)

 

ID

Senators:

Jim Risch (R)

 

IL

Senators:

Dick Durbin (D)

 

KS

Senators:

Jerry Moran (R)

 

LA

Representatives:

Steve Scalise (R)

Senators:

Mary Landrieu (D)

David Vitter (R)

 

MD

Senators:

Ben Cardin (D)

 

MI

Representatives:

John Conyers (D)

 

MN

Senators:

Al Franken (D)

Amy Klobuchar (D)

 

MO

Senators:

Roy Blunt (R)

 

MS

Representatives:

Alan Nunnelee (R)

Senators:

Thad Cochran (R)

 

NC

Representatives:

Melvin Watt (D)

Senators:

Kay Hagan (D)

 

NE

Representatives:

Lee Terry (R)

 

NH

Senators:

Kelly Ayotte (R)

Jeanne Shaheen (D)

 

NJ

Senators:

Bob Menendez (D)

 

NM

Representatives:

Ben R. Luján (D)

Senators:

Jeff Bingaman (D)

Tom Udall (D)

 

NV

Representatives:

Mark Amodei (R)

 

NY

Representatives:

Peter T. King (R)

Bill Owens (D)

Senators:

Kirsten Gillibrand (D)

Chuck Schumer (D)

 

OH

Representatives:

Steve Chabot (R)

Senators:

Sherrod Brown (D)

 

PA

Representatives:

Tim Holden (D)

Thomas Marino (R)

Senators:

Bob Casey, Jr. (D)

 

RI

Senators:

Sheldon Whitehouse (D)

 

SC

Senators:

Lindsey Graham (R)

 

SD

Senators:

Tim Johnson (D)

 

TN

Representatives:

Marsha Blackburn (R)

Jim Cooper (D)

Senators:

Lamar Alexander (R)

Bob Corker (R)

 

TX

Representatives:

John Carter (R)

 

UT

Senators:

Orrin Hatch (R)

 

VA

Representatives:

Bob Goodlatte (R)

 

VT

Senators:

Patrick Leahy (D)

 

WI

Senators:

Herb Kohl (D)

 

WY

Senators:

Mike Enzi (R)

A really great talk by Alan Kay

Not just demo’ing ideas, rehashing history, but actually getting into their guts a bit.

Originally shared by Jean Bezivin on Google+

Alan Kay on DSLs :

http://goo.gl/5j3Bw

– The present is not important. What is important is the past and the future.

– DSLs are not a new idea. It is exactly what people called POL (Problem Oriented Languages) 50 years ago.

Thanks Jim Steel for mentioning this presentation.

More generally this #VPRI (ViewPoints Research Institute) is really doing cool stuff:

http://goo.gl/NHUAU